Two-Part Epoxy Clay

Coloring Two-Part Epoxy Clay
for Jewelry Making


We carry a two-part epoxy clay that only comes in white. While being less expensive than the Crystal Clay™, there is a little bit of work involved in tinting the clay. We have done a few experiments to give you some idea of the mediums and their results. You will probably want to do a few of your own experiments.

To use the clay without a tint (white), you first take Part A (the resin) and mix it with an equal amount of Part B (the hardener). You just smash it between your fingers over and over again and roll the two parts around until they are thoroughly mixed. Since the hardener is a gray color you can see when they are completely mixed.

Once you have mixed the two parts, you have about 60 minutes to complete you project. Form the clay into any shape you like, and use a beeswax stick or rhinestone picker to pick up and push the rhinestones into the clay. You can also add pieces of metal, beads, or most any other embellishment. If you are working on a large project, you can add to the project while the clay is went or dry. However, if you are tinting the clay, we recommend tinting as much of the clay as you think you'll need and covering it and setting it aside until you need it. This will insure that all of your resin/clay is the same color.

If you are tinting the clay you, will take Part A (the resin) and mix it with the tint first. Once you have mixed your color into the clay, you will then mix it with an equal amount of Part B (the hardener). It can then be used the same as if you were using the clay without any tint. Be sure to keep both parts of the clay covered in plastic when you are not using them. It is especially important to keep the hardener in a baggie or air-tight container at all times.

You can use a number of items to color your resin/clay: lip powder, blush, eye shadow, craft paint, artist paint, fine glitter, powdered color pigment for clay, and many other things. If you want to add a bit of color after your work is finished but not set up you, can brush on eye shadow, mica powder, or other powders/glitters. However, you do not want to add anything wet or you will end up coloring your stones and making them look dull. Below is a picture of the items/mediums that were used with the following five experiments.



Dark Lip Powder Tint

The first experiment was done with a very dark lip powder. This gave us a fairly dark tint. From the first picture below, you can see the difference in the intensity of the color of the lip powder to the finished item, shown in the second picture below.



Craft Paint Tint

The second experiment was done with dark red acrylic craft paint. This gave us a fairly light tint. From the first picture below, you can see the difference in the intensity of the color of the paint to the finished item, shown in the second picture below.



Ink Tint

The third experiment was done with red ink. This gave us a very light tint. From the first picture below, you can see the difference in the intensity of the color of the ink to the finished item, which is the pale pink side of the two-tone ring below.



Artist Paint Tint

The fourth experiment was a dark red artist paint. The tint with this item was the second darkest tint we were able to achieve. From the first picture below, you can see the difference in the intensity of the color of the paint to the finished item, shown in the second picture below.



Clay Pigment Tint

The fifth experiment was done with a blue pigment powder that is used with clay. The pigment can be found at most clay shops. This gave us a very dark tint. From the first picture below, you can see the difference in the intensity of the color of the powder to the finished item, which is the dark blue side of the two-tone ring below.



Two-part epoxy clay has endless possibilities. You can make brooches, rings, necklaces, beads, charms, sculptures, stones, and drawer pulls, or cover compacts, phone cases, heels of shoes, and much more!